All posts tagged: Dutch Design

Kiki van Eijk, The Joy of a Playing Child

Interview with Kiki van Eijk Eindhoven, 19.09.2016 Kiki van Eijk is an artist, craftsman and designer who does not follow any trends. She is incredibly versatile, working with fabric, ceramics, glass, metal, wood and other diverse materials with ease and control. In her design she fuses art and craft, knowing she can turn a loose drawing into an object that cannot only be functional but also artistically appealing. When I think about her design it is immediately clear that she is a creator who intuitively knows what is wrong and what is right for each piece. A graduate of Design Academy Eindhoven, Kiki concentrates primarily on her own collections, but also has worked on projects for, among others, Design Academy Eindhoven, MOOOI, Häagen-Dazs, Bernhardt Design, Forbo Flooring, Venice Projects, Hermès, Nodus, Rijksmuseum and a number of private collectors. KK: How do you define design? KvE: First of all, I think design has only existed since the Industrial Revolution, because before that it was artists who would make everything. They would make paintings but they would …

Irma Boom, Hella Jongerius, Alice Rawsthorn, Beat Wyss and Aaron Betsky

Interesting design doesn’t exist to serve the purpose of a device but to exceed it by pure representation. In borderline case, the purpose becomes pure form. A designed object is successful when its daily use becomes a cultivated habit. Habit, unlike purpose-driven assistance, is an end in itself. About Authorship, Beat Wyss, Some Book: Graphic Expressions between Design and Art We are living at a time when once-familiar objects are disappearing from our lives. Any product is at risk if its function can be fulfilled as effectively by the software or a digital device like a smart phone or tablet that can do numerous other things too. Those imperilled objects will only survive if they offer us something enticing that eludes their digital equivalents, whether it is aesthetic, sensual or functional. Life in Design (Irma Boom’s books) by Alice Rawsthorn, Frieze Magazine Innovation is the highest priority. You have to have a reason to make a new piece. You have to look at a product from another angle, give something to the design profession, or innovate on a …