All posts filed under: Photography

Wojciech Zamecznik, Photo-Graphics

Briefly Noted Warsaw, Zachęta – Natonal Galery of Art Wojciech Zamecznik, Photo-Graphics Photography and film combine the features of the biological and the technological eye, and perhaps thanks to that they are able to merge two models of knowledge–the optical, which is deemed passive, with the participatory one. It could be asserted that for Wojciech Zamecznik, photography and film were ways of being in the world and the tools for changing it. Therefore, that which supports the hegemony of seeing–photography, perceived as the “witness” or “trace”–becomes a tool for its deconstruction or gradual modification. Karolina Ziębińska-Lewandowska, The Power of Seeing /’

REVELATIONS

Do not go outside, return into yourself; it is in the interiority of the person where the truth dwells. –Saint Augustine Human beings are destined for contemplation. –Éric Chenal Revelations is the title of a humble and beautifully executed project and exhibition at the National Museum of History and Art (NMHA) in Luxembourg. In 2013 the museum commissioned Éric Chenal to take pictures during the renovation of the museum’s new wing. Chenal’s photographs depict entrances, windows, walls half covered with paint and markings, and other ordinary objects and parts of the buildings. The colors are muted with occasional bursts of light blue and green, vivid red and orange. Chenal describes his first encounter with the site as challenging. It didn’t have a lot of appeal and he admitted in a conversation we had that he was unable to stay long. He didn’t feel welcome. He would only photograph the buildings when nobody was around and it was quiet, because this was the only way he could enter into dialog with the empty space. But as …

NEVER FOR MONEY ALWAYS FOR LOVE and Bruce Duckworth’s lecture at Mudam Luxembourg, CONSUMPTION at the V&A

We’re culture that is always looking for that other message, always looking for that new arrangement. Cloude Levi Strauss The Strange Mind The last couple of weeks I spent on reading about brands and branding, about material culture and self-transformation. I have also visited NEVER FOR MONEY ALWAYS FOR LOVE exhibition and had a chance to listen to Bruce Duckworth’s lecture on packaging design. The lecture inspired me to go back to a series of interviews from Brand Thinking by Debbie Millman and Chief Culture Officer by Grant McCracken. I also went to London to see CONSUMPTION at the V&A. And, the whole thing in this post is an interesting mix of different aspects of our material culture. NEVER FOR MONEY ALWAYS FOR LOVE Design has successfully established itself-so much so that it has become an and in itself, something more than just a tool to boost sales; rather, it creates “meaning” and becomes the actual purpose of buying. … Good designers must be part-sociologist or “social seismographers”: they must be in close contact with the needs, …

The Ordinary

I like the fact that the world is a very strange place, but I also like the fact that even the most boring places can be quite interesting. So, part of my job is to see extraordinary in a very ordinary. Martin Parr Think of Finland Once you look at what seems ordinary long enough, though, it often turns odd and unfamiliar, as any child repeatedly saying his own name aloud learns. (And so I try it! horowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitzhorowitz … and my last name becomes a pulsing, throbbing vowel-crushing machine.) Alexandra Horowitz On Looking One popular American guidebook, The Laws of Etiquette; or, Short Rules and Reflections for Conduct in Society, informed readers that they ‘may wipe their lips on the tablecloth, but not blow their noses with it’. Another solemnly reminded readers that it was not polite in refined circles to smell a piece of meat while it was on one’s fork. It also explained: ‘The ordinary custom among well-bred persons is as follows: soup is taken with a spoon.’ Bill Bryson At Home If you just …

Marian Bantjes, Ed Emberley, Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

What Marian Bantjes, Ed Emberley, Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor have in common? They are passionate about what they do, they always move forward and they are true to themselves. Recently I’ve been exploring a collection of documentaries on lynda.com. The quotes below come from three documentaries I’ve watched a couple of days ago, and these were: Marian Bantjes, Graphic Artist; Ed Emberley, Children’s Book Illustrator and Jerry Uelsmann & Maggie Taylor: This is not photography. You do what you’re told, and you do what you’re told over and over again, and eventually you learn. You learn what is the right way and the wrong way to do things. I mean, that’s one of the things I like about typography is that there is a right way and a wrong way. There are variations within that. There are personal tastes and various things, but you can really–you can screw it up. Everything I do, I do for love. So my goal at that time really was to just keep putting stuff out there, keep making things, keep exploring these …

Commonplaces: René Burri, Carlos Fuentes, Diego Velázquez and Johannes Vermeer

As a photographer I have led a double life – one in black and white and one in color. René Burri Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (the Museum of Design in Zurich) is now showing René Burri’s Doppelleben (A Double Life), a homage exhibition for his 80th birthday. Burri makes a pointed statement, the “artist” in him, with his interest in the play of forms and colors, loves confusion, puzzle and mystery. In his pictures we repeatedly find views through, inside or outside that are in someway unsettling. Windows and mirrors play an important role, they double the world: labyrinths for the eyes. The theme of the “picture in the picture” occurs regularly, the world as a stage, everyday life as a stage. From the exhibition’s brochure The exhibition gives a chance to know the stories behind some of the photographs. Here is one of them: New York City, USA, 1998 I was at the top of the Magnum building on Spring Street and this was the building next door. I happened to look out and see …