All posts filed under: Cheryl Heller

Activism by Design

In the new issue of Traces published by Casino Luxembourg – forum d’art contemporain there’s an article I wrote last year. Design awakens desire. Design infatuates and seduces. And design has the beguiling power to stoke our appetite for contraptions and gizmos we don’t yet possess and hardly need. There’s no question about it, design is a business, and as such it feeds on us. This is the sophisticated and predatory ecosystem modern designers must fit into, although the reason they get into design in the first place might be a need to do something worthy, to solve problems, to change the world. Dennis Elbers and Sven Ehmann, the curators of Resolute: Design Changes, are showing how the design community, empowered by technology, is experiencing a change in which independent creative individuals, with the help of crowd funding, open source platforms, and social media, can have impact on society. “Resolute is the outcome of an ongoing conversation between me and Denis Elbers, the force behind the Graphic Design Festival in Breda”, said Sven Ehmann when …

DESIGN CHANGES

Existing political, economical, ecological and even social structures are widely questioned. … As a consequence design can no longer only be defined by just technical performance, aesthetics, or creativity. … Dennis Elbers, London Calling, Dee, Issue 3, 2014 It is still quite rare to see a design exhibition in a museum. But thanks to Dennis Elbers and Sven Ehmann’s initiative, and the sensitive approach to design of Nadine Clemens, the president of Design Friends Luxembourg, it is now possible to see Resolute–Design Changes exhibition at the Casino Luxembourg–Forum d’art contemporain. The projects presented in Resolute and Postscript Luxembourg give us insight into how socially responsible designers approach social problems and how they try to solve them on a bigger scale. What’s interesting is that these designers always work in, with and for a community. Their work is no longer just about staging provocations; it is about involvement and finding solution. Design for Social Innovation applies the abilities of talented individuals to collective creativity and to the transformation of complex systems at great scale. In this new role, the designer’s practice takes place not in private studio but …

Look and See

To observe, you must learn to separate situation from interpretation, yourself from what you’re seeing. (…) Choosing wisely means being selective. It means not only looking but looking properly with real thought. It means looking with a real knowledge that what you note – and how you note it – will form the basis of any future deductions you might make. It’s about seeing the full picture, noting the details that matter, and understanding how to contextualize those details within a broader framework of thought. (…) Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes by Maria Konnikova The power we have as designers is that we are generalists. Designers have the ability to see systems and patterns. Cheryl Heller Designers need to make connections and see the overall picture. When you’re able to assess information and anticipate future impacts, objectively, you can see and understand the whole picture. Maggie Macnab

So much more than just a buzzword?

Maria Popova ᔥ in an interview for Steven Heller’s book Writing and Research said: The design world, especially the ever-growing piece of it that deals with the intersection of design and business, or creativity and corporation, tends to reduce complex arguments and ideas to sound bites that can fit on a Powerpoint slide. (Okay, perhaps Keynote.) Over the past few years–or, some might even say, decades–words and terms that once stood for something have become vacant of meaning, thrown around as weightless fluff. What is Design Thinking? Creative thinking-in-action. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_thinking ᔥ A discipline that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods to match people’s needs with what is technologically feasible and what a viable business strategy can convert into customer value and market opportunity. Design Thinking by Tim Brown, Harvard Business Review, June 2008  ᔥ A comfort zone where graphic metaphors are the basis for creating and co creating. Visual Facilitation by Jane Cheng, ID PURE, issue No. 30 ᔥ   Can designers design without thinking? Do doctors feel the need to remind us that they think about health? …As …